Roadside Vegetation Management Program

Linn County’s Right-of-Way Vegetation Management Program emphasizes the establishment of adaptable and long-lived vegetation via:

  • Soil amendments added where appropriate
  • Sediment control
  • Non-competitive stabilizing crop seeding
  • Permanent seeding / plantings at appropriate times with species matched to the soils and hydrology of the site
  • Certified weed seed free mulch used on all applications
  • Prescribed burning (spring and fall – fall only in areas with adequate surface roughness adjacent to rights-of-way to retain rolling and skipping snow)
  • Entire right-of-way mowed once during the first growing after permanent seeding (July 18 to August 12)
  • Right-of-way spot mowed once during second growing season after permanent seeding (June 6 to August 12)
  • Adjacent property owner education
  • Work in the right-of-way permits
  Shoulder Mowing
  • Hard Surfaced Roads (including county seal-coated roads): Three times during the growing season (target completion dates: June 10, August 12, October 14)
  • Gravel Roads: Two times during the growing season (target completion dates: July 8, September 30)
  Spot Mowing
Spot mowing is done to control noxious weeds and potential woody hazards and obstructions.
  • Rights-of-way 66 feet and less in width are spot mowed every 12 months.
  • Rights-of-way greater than 66 feet in width are spot mowed from July 18 to August 12.
  Spot Spraying (Herbaceous Plants)
Foliar spraying of noxious weeds / invasive species (physiology of individual plant species, circumstances not practical to mow or otherwise control)
  • Cirsium Arvense – Canada Thistle (bud to bloom)
  • Cirsium Vulgare – Bull Thistle (bud to bloom)
  • Carduus Nutans – Musk Thistle (bud to bloom)
  • Dipsacus spp. – Teasel (bud to bloom)
  • Euphorbia Esula - Leafy Spurge (fall)
  • Polygonum Cuspidatum - Japanese Knotweed (early to mid growing season)
  Tree / Shrub Management
  • Hazard and obstruction removal (storm damage, 10-foot Clear Zone - traffic / speed / slope)
  • Maintenance of clear zone (16 feet by 16 feet - ANSI A300)
  • Cut stump herbicide treatment and foliar spraying woody species less than 5 feet in height (physiology of individual plant species, circumstances not practical to mow or otherwise control) including requests for service (in a timely manner).

The concept of integrated roadside vegetation management (IRVM) has a relatively long history in the state of Iowa. Learn more by visiting the Iowa Living Roadway Trust Fund website.
 
Learn more about the successful use of integrated roadside vegetation management (IRVM) in Linn County.

Resources